Finally, an Excellent Crisis Plan Form, Plus the Most Fine Madness First Aid Kit

September 27, 2009 at 4:30 am | Posted in Links, Resources, Wellness | Leave a comment

I’ve been searching for awhile now for a decent crisis plan or advanced directive; I finally found one by opening a document that had been sitting neglected on my desktop for weeks: Sonny Kentucky’s Madness First Aid Kit, which I stumbled upon while strolling around the Icarus Project Website. (I just can’t say enough good about those folks — it’s a community of people with whom I really resonate. The link is on the right.)

Anyway, here’s the link for the crisis plan. Like the author, Mary Ellen Copeland, I suggest that you fill it out slowly over the course of several days rather than trying to rip through it in one sitting. If you’re like me, you may tend to whip through such things in a burst of enthusiasm, then lose them or forget to implement them.

The Crisis Plan above comes from mentalhealthrecovery.com; I was impressed during my short (30-minute) visit — Copeland has many excellent suggestions for improving wellness. I particularly like how she gives specific, concrete suggestions concerning how to go about certain activities that bossy people like me always recommend. For example, people preach that you must have friends, but it can be hard for mentally ill people to develop and maintain friendships. Copeland explains how to make friends, and gives a lot of basic dos and don’ts that you’ll need to bear in mind as you reach out. (And that I need to bear in mind as I reach out.)

Copeland offers a $15 online course on how to develop what she calls a Wellness Action Recovery Plan; I think I will take it and report back. I liked her free material enough to want to support her, and to know that I could benefit from her insight. Also, $15 seems like a really reasonable price. I like the fact that many bipolar people (who may be unable to work or underemployed) can probably afford it.

Coming up, perhaps even today: the benefits of engaging in mental health advocacy and stigma-busting, and another book review.

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